⚠️Panic for Prince Harry as HALF of Americans want his visa reviewed over drug admission ///

Amajority of Americans are pushing for Prince Harry's visa to be reviewed following the release of his tell-all memoir Spare in January, a shock new poll shows.

The Duke of Sussex revealed he had taken cocaine, cannabis and magic mushrooms in the past - an admission that has attracted the attention of conservative think tank The Heritage Foundation, which is going through the courts to compel the release of his visa application.

The conservative body believes the public has a right to know whether Harry got a "preferential treatment" into the US or if he lied about his past drug use.

US immigration law regards any failure to declare drug use to immigration officials as a serious violation that can result in deportation and being permanently barred from applying for citizenship.

Now, a poll undertaken for Newsweek by strategists Redfield & Wilton, showed that 54 percent of US adults from a sample of 1,500 registered voters believed that the Prince's visa should be reviewed after he admitted to using cocaine and psychedelics recreationally in his memoir, Spare.

READ MORE: Americans 'have a right to know' if Harry was given visa free pass despite drug admission

Asked "Given his admission in his book Spare that he previously consumed drugs, should Prince Harry's visa application be reviewed by the Department of Homeland Security?" 54 percent of respondents said "yes", while 29 percent said "no" and 17 percent "don't know".

The polling comes days after the Heritage Foundation announced it is suing the Department of Homeland Security in order to get the Duke's visa application out into the public domain.

The conservative think tank is calling for the immediate publication of the Duke's visa records after he admitted to drug use in Spare.

Speaking exclusively to Express.co.uk, Washington-based commentator Nile Gardiner, who is aligned with The Heritage Foundation, claimed the case is watertight.

"There's a clear public interest in ensuring US immigration law is applied equally to everyone who applies to the United States. The principle is fundamentally important here. No one should be above the law. No one should receive preferential treatment. Immigration law should be applied effectively in all cases," the commentator said.

Harry's high-profile status makes the public interest argument a no-brainer, Gardiner claimed.

He explained: "Harry is a huge public figure. He has a significant status on the international stage. He's increasingly a political figure as well."

Gardiner continued: "He has revealed widespread and extensive drug use in his memoirs.

"And the public has a right to know if he was honest and truthful and honest in his application."

Despite the majority of Americans believing Harry's visa should be reviewed, a similar percentage said they felt the Prince was right to detail his history with substance use in his memoir, which was billed as a "raw" and "unflinching" look at his life, not as a prince but as a "man".

The Duke spoke candidly about his drug use and experimentation in Spare as means of dealing with the grief of losing his mother, Princess Diana, at a young age and handling the pressures of being a figure of intense public interest.

Writing of the time of Queen Elizabeth's Golden Jubilee in 2002, the prince wrote: "I had been doing cocaine around this time. At someone's country house, during a shooting weekend, I'd been offered a line, and I'd done a few more since. It wasn't much fun, and it didn't make me particularly happy, as it seemed to make everyone around me, but it did make me feel different, and that was the main goal. Feel. Different. I was a deeply unhappy seventeen-year-old boy willing to try almost anything that would alter the status quo."

He also went on to say he used marijuana and the psychedelic ayahuasca, which he found more beneficial.

Speaking in an interview to promote Spare with the trauma expert Dr. Gabor Mate, Harry expanded on his cocaine use, saying: "(Cocaine) didn't do anything for me, it was more a social thing and gave me a sense of belonging for sure. I think it probably also made me feel different to the way I was feeling, which was kind of the point. Marijuana is different, that actually really did help me."

Harry sparked backlash for appearing in part, to glamourize or promote drug use or experimentation through his book and media appearances.

British drug education advocate and founder of the DSM Foundation, Fiona Spargo-Mabbs, said that Harry's revelations could prove harmful to impressionable young people.

"It is understandable that when people are struggling, they look around for ways to cope," she told ITV News.

"This is particularly true of young people, an increasing number of whom we know have been struggling with their mental health during and since COVID, yet who are unable to access support services because they are so stretched.

src : https://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/world/panic-for-prince-harry-as-half-of-americans-want-his-visa-reviewed-over-drug-admission/ar-AA1aGwcQ?ocid=BingHPC

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⚠️Panic for Prince Harry as HALF of Americans want his visa reviewed over drug admission

Added to [ Royalty, World Leaders... and categorized in 10 months ago

⚠️Panic for Prince Harry as HALF of Americans want his visa reviewed over drug admission ///

Amajority of Americans are pushing for Prince Harry's visa to be reviewed following the release of his tell-all memoir Spare in January, a shock new poll shows.

The Duke of Sussex revealed he had taken cocaine, cannabis and magic mushrooms in the past - an admission that has attracted the attention of conservative think tank The Heritage Foundation, which is going through the courts to compel the release of his visa application.

The conservative body believes the public has a right to know whether Harry got a "preferential treatment" into the US or if he lied about his past drug use.

US immigration law regards any failure to declare drug use to immigration officials as a serious violation that can result in deportation and being permanently barred from applying for citizenship.

Now, a poll undertaken for Newsweek by strategists Redfield & Wilton, showed that 54 percent of US adults from a sample of 1,500 registered voters believed that the Prince's visa should be reviewed after he admitted to using cocaine and psychedelics recreationally in his memoir, Spare.

READ MORE: Americans 'have a right to know' if Harry was given visa free pass despite drug admission

Asked "Given his admission in his book Spare that he previously consumed drugs, should Prince Harry's visa application be reviewed by the Department of Homeland Security?" 54 percent of respondents said "yes", while 29 percent said "no" and 17 percent "don't know".

The polling comes days after the Heritage Foundation announced it is suing the Department of Homeland Security in order to get the Duke's visa application out into the public domain.

The conservative think tank is calling for the immediate publication of the Duke's visa records after he admitted to drug use in Spare.

Speaking exclusively to Express.co.uk, Washington-based commentator Nile Gardiner, who is aligned with The Heritage Foundation, claimed the case is watertight.

"There's a clear public interest in ensuring US immigration law is applied equally to everyone who applies to the United States. The principle is fundamentally important here. No one should be above the law. No one should receive preferential treatment. Immigration law should be applied effectively in all cases," the commentator said.

Harry's high-profile status makes the public interest argument a no-brainer, Gardiner claimed.

He explained: "Harry is a huge public figure. He has a significant status on the international stage. He's increasingly a political figure as well."

Gardiner continued: "He has revealed widespread and extensive drug use in his memoirs.

"And the public has a right to know if he was honest and truthful and honest in his application."

Despite the majority of Americans believing Harry's visa should be reviewed, a similar percentage said they felt the Prince was right to detail his history with substance use in his memoir, which was billed as a "raw" and "unflinching" look at his life, not as a prince but as a "man".

The Duke spoke candidly about his drug use and experimentation in Spare as means of dealing with the grief of losing his mother, Princess Diana, at a young age and handling the pressures of being a figure of intense public interest.

Writing of the time of Queen Elizabeth's Golden Jubilee in 2002, the prince wrote: "I had been doing cocaine around this time. At someone's country house, during a shooting weekend, I'd been offered a line, and I'd done a few more since. It wasn't much fun, and it didn't make me particularly happy, as it seemed to make everyone around me, but it did make me feel different, and that was the main goal. Feel. Different. I was a deeply unhappy seventeen-year-old boy willing to try almost anything that would alter the status quo."

He also went on to say he used marijuana and the psychedelic ayahuasca, which he found more beneficial.

Speaking in an interview to promote Spare with the trauma expert Dr. Gabor Mate, Harry expanded on his cocaine use, saying: "(Cocaine) didn't do anything for me, it was more a social thing and gave me a sense of belonging for sure. I think it probably also made me feel different to the way I was feeling, which was kind of the point. Marijuana is different, that actually really did help me."

Harry sparked backlash for appearing in part, to glamourize or promote drug use or experimentation through his book and media appearances.

British drug education advocate and founder of the DSM Foundation, Fiona Spargo-Mabbs, said that Harry's revelations could prove harmful to impressionable young people.

"It is understandable that when people are struggling, they look around for ways to cope," she told ITV News.

"This is particularly true of young people, an increasing number of whom we know have been struggling with their mental health during and since COVID, yet who are unable to access support services because they are so stretched.

src : https://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/world/panic-for-prince-harry-as-half-of-americans-want-his-visa-reviewed-over-drug-admission/ar-AA1aGwcQ?ocid=BingHPC

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